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Markos Kounalakis

US Public Radio Series

America Abroad is an award-winning documentary radio program distributed by Public Radio International (PRI) and broadcast on public radio stations nationwide. Each month, we take an in-depth look at one critical issue in international affairs and U.S. foreign policy.

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America Abroad joined CNN as a media partner at a bipartisan roundtable discussion to assess the US foreign policy challenges confronting the next American president. The roundtable featured five former Secretaries of State – Madeleine K. Albright, James A. Baker, III, Warren Christopher, Henry Kissinger, and Colin L. Powell.

It’s the summer of political conventions: Democrats in Denver, Republicans in Minneapolis, and jocks in Beijing. The Olympics are more than just fun and games—they’re also a forum for international politics. China hopes to make its Olympic games the nation’s coming out party. It’s hardly the first time the five-ring spectacle has been the venue for national agendas or grandstanding—think Moscow in 1980 or Hitler’s Berlin. And so far, controversy has surrounded Beijing—Tibet, Darfur, protests, threats of boycotts.

The Vatican enjoys a privileged and unique status as the only religion represented at the United Nations and dozens of other international bodies. At times this ruffles feathers when Church doctrine clashes with secular affairs of state. Still, the Church manages to tend its flock of more than one billion Catholics worldwide, while its legions of clergy and diplomats also carry on the faith’s tradition of ministering to global matters, by promoting development, advocating for religious freedom and building peace. 

Guests on this program include:

For six decades, Taiwan’s political status has been unresolved. In that time, the small island’s economic dynamism has made it a major player in the global market. But its economic success hasn’t translated into political clout on the international stage. As China’s sphere of influence expands, the island it considers a rogue province is losing friends. Taipei’s occasional gestures towards independence have stroked the ire of China, and the US has backed its democratic ally.

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