Sub-Saharan Africa

“This message of extremism is alien. It's alien to their culture, it's alien to their communities, it's alien for their future.”

(Amb. Phillip Carter, former Deputy to the Commander for Civil Military Engagements, United States Africa Command) 

In this hour-long program, we look at poaching — once a conservation issue, but now a full-blown threat to national security.

The recent attack on the U.S. consulate in Benghazi underscored the dangers posed by extremist groups in Libya. But these risks extend beyond Libya, with the rise of jihadist organizations like al Qaeda in the Islamic Maghreb, Ansar Dine, and Boko Haram. This month America Abroad takes listeners to Mali, Nigeria, Libya and Kenya to explore Islamism in Africa.

"This is an unfinishable battle. [You] try to do everything, but it is a long war." 
– Gyula Almási, head of Hungary’s Intellectual Property Rights Defense Department

The U.S. is often thought of as the land of innovation – a great habitat for entrepreneurs. And, this is still the case. But, why are other regions of the world, such as Sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America, producing entrepreneurs at a faster rate than the United States?

AIDS has been a viral wrecking ball across Africa, and much of the globe for that matter. More than 25 million have died from the disease, but the international community’s bedside manner is getting better. NGOs, nations and international organizations are building up a global resistance to the deadly virus. They’ve succeeding in treating millions already infected with HIV, but stemming the spread is a much tougher case. And with the doctor’s orders often running up against religious convictions and traditional customs, prescribing a potent prevention protocol is a complicated operation.

Sudan has been at war with itself for decades. Arab Muslims in the north have long dominated Christian and animist Africans in the south. But, in a referendum scheduled for January 2011, southerners are expected to vote for separation. And the divorce may not be pretty. The south will take water, land, and about three quarters of Sudan’s oil with it. That’s one of many reasons the north opposes the divorce, and why there’s fear of a return to conflict. 

Pages