Document Leaks: The consequences of revealing secrets

Document Leaks: The consequences of revealing secrets

Massive document leaks have led to the fall of world leaders and to new anti-corruption laws. But some leaks have put lives in danger. So, is there a  limit to the public’s right to know?

When is leaking documents and revealing secrets worth the potential security risks? This hour, we’ll talk about when document leaks are legal, when they are morally justified, and when they aren’t -  how, at times,  they’ve put lives in danger. We’ll look at the balance of protecting national security versus freedom of the press and the responsibility of journalists once they obtain leaked documents.  

Beyond our borders we’ll look at the extraordinary measures China takes to suppress secrets; how Finland is grappling with its first major leak; and how military leaders in Pakistan may have used a leak for their own political advantage. Finally we’ll examine what it takes for a leaked document to ignite a political movement.

Featuring interviews with: 

Hardy Merriman - president of the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict
Gen. Michael Hayden - former director of the CIA and NSA
Jameel Jaffer - executive director of the Knight First Amendment Institute at Columbia University
RB Brenner - director of the journalism school at the University of Texas, Austin
Heather Conley - director of the Europe Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies
Juan Zarate - former Deputy National Security Advisor under President George W. BushJuan Zarate - former Deputy National Security Advisor under President George W. Bush
Will Fitzgibbon - reporter at the International Consortium of Investigative Journalists
Christopher Ahlberg - co-founder of Recorded Future Threat Intelligence