Tunisia

Arabs under thirty drove the region's revolutions, and they have emerged as prominent social and political actors. But with new governments now in power, are youth satisfied with the pace of change? On this month’s episode of America Abroad – Youth in the Arab World: After the Revolution – we travel to Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco and Tunisia to find out.

The Arab Awakening has led to a rise in Islamist governments in the Middle East – increasing concerns about the rights of religious minorities. The Middle East is largely Muslim but it’s also the birthplace of Christianity, Judaism, and many other religions. Many non-Muslims have left in recent decades, leaving relatively small populations of non-Muslims and Muslim minority sects. Now, the rise of Islamist political parties in the Mideast raises questions about the rights and protections such minorities can expect or whether they can expect them at all.

The Middle East is largely Muslim but it’s also the birthplace of Christianity, Judaism, and many other religions. Many non-Muslims have left in recent decades, leaving relatively small populations of non-Muslims and Muslim minority sects.

Now, the rise of Islamist political parties in the Mideast raises questions about the rights and protections such minorities can expect or whether they can expect them at all.

Have women in Arab countries achieved greater equality since the revolutions swept the region, and which rights are yet to be won?

The revolutions that swept across the Middle East in 2011, known as "The Arab Spring," promised greater freedoms for many in the region, including women. While there have been some advances in women's rights, the promise in many cases has not been realized.

In this month's show, Women's Rights after the Arab Spring, we travel to Egypt, Tunisia, Turkey and the Gulf States to assess how and where women's rights have progressed.

Thursday, November 24, 2011

AAM partnered with Shems FM to host a town hall connecting audiences and experts in Tunis, Sidi Bouzid and Bizerte to discuss the consequences of personal freedom in a democracy. The two-hour program featured experts from across the political spectrum, including professors, journalists and artists, as well as audience participants from each of the three locations.

Guests included:

Monday, January 9, 2012

AAM partnered with Al Wataniya Television to host a town hall bringing together audience members from 11 towns and governorates across Tunisia to discuss economic development in their country. The ninety-minute program featured discussion amongst the 40 audience participants from the coast, interior, and south of Tunisia. 

Panelists included:

Saturday, February 18, 2012

AAM partnered with Hannibal TV, one of Tunisia’s leading independent television stations, to produce a town hall connecting audience members from across Tunisia with government ministers to discuss the numerous corruption cases that are hindering Tunisia's economic development.

Panelists included:

Monday, March 26, 2012

AAM partnered with Shems FM to produce a town hall connecting audiences in the coastal city of Gabes and the rural city of Kairouan for direct discussion on citizen participation in the political process. 

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

AAM partnered with Hannibal TV – one of Tunisia’s largest television channels – to host a town hall discussion focused on the role of civil society in Tunisia’s democratic transition.  The event brought audience members from across Tunisia together with civil society activists, experts, and government officials to discuss the importance of civil society organizations (CSOs) in a post-Ben Ali Tunisia, and the successes and challenges they’ve faced since the revolution.

Panelists included:

Monday, May 14, 2012

AAM partnered with Mosaique FM to host a town hall discussion on Tunisia’s youth unemployment crisis. The event broadcast live on Mosaique FM and connected audiences in the coastal city of Nabeul and the rural city of Syliana.

The timely discussion covered topics such as:

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