Syria

Syrian journalist Mezar Matar knows what it’s like to live in fear in a city under ISIS control. He also knows what it’s like to escape.

The ongoing war in Syria has led to the worst refugee crisis since World War II. And now, many of those refugees are heading for Europe. 700,000 have made the treacherous journey across the Mediterranean so far and another 100,000 are expected before the year's end.

Arabs under thirty drove the region's revolutions, and they have emerged as prominent social and political actors. But with new governments now in power, are youth satisfied with the pace of change? On this month’s episode of America Abroad – Youth in the Arab World: After the Revolution – we travel to Egypt, Lebanon, Morocco and Tunisia to find out.

President Obama's second term begins with a series of foreign policy challenges on his plate. From unrest in the Middle East, to a rising China, to Europe's economic woes, the next Obama administration will face a series of foreign policy challenges. To learn more listen to this month's episode of America Abroad – Obama's Foreign Policy Challenges: The Next 4 Years.

The Arab Awakening has led to a rise in Islamist governments in the Middle East – increasing concerns about the rights of religious minorities. The Middle East is largely Muslim but it’s also the birthplace of Christianity, Judaism, and many other religions. Many non-Muslims have left in recent decades, leaving relatively small populations of non-Muslims and Muslim minority sects. Now, the rise of Islamist political parties in the Mideast raises questions about the rights and protections such minorities can expect or whether they can expect them at all.

The next President of the United States may face some very tough foreign policy decisions early in his administration. So it’s important that American voters know where candidates stand on the key issues. From the volatile situation in Syria to the challenges posed by China, host Ray Suarez and our panelists discuss the foreign policy differences and similarities between Barack Obama and Mitt Romney. 

The Middle East is largely Muslim but it’s also the birthplace of Christianity, Judaism, and many other religions. Many non-Muslims have left in recent decades, leaving relatively small populations of non-Muslims and Muslim minority sects.

Now, the rise of Islamist political parties in the Mideast raises questions about the rights and protections such minorities can expect or whether they can expect them at all.

Across the Arab world, Islamists are the new political power brokers. In elections in Egypt, Tunisia, and Morocco, Islamists won big. Similar results are expected in Libya, and if the Assad regime falls, they might well emerge on top in Syria too. After decades of repression by secular rulers, Islamists are now poised to transform the region's politics and culture. But it's still not clear what they plan to do with their power, and what that will mean for those who don’t share their views. 

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