Saudi Arabia

Across the Arab world, Islamists are the new political power brokers. In elections in Egypt, Tunisia, and Morocco, Islamists won big. Similar results are expected in Libya, and if the Assad regime falls, they might well emerge on top in Syria too. After decades of repression by secular rulers, Islamists are now poised to transform the region's politics and culture. But it's still not clear what they plan to do with their power, and what that will mean for those who don’t share their views. 

Have women in Arab countries achieved greater equality since the revolutions swept the region, and which rights are yet to be won?

The revolutions that swept across the Middle East in 2011, known as "The Arab Spring," promised greater freedoms for many in the region, including women. While there have been some advances in women's rights, the promise in many cases has not been realized.

In this month's show, Women's Rights after the Arab Spring, we travel to Egypt, Tunisia, Turkey and the Gulf States to assess how and where women's rights have progressed.

With oil prices topping $60 a barrel and global demand for oil projected to increase in the coming years, can the United States maintain its standard of living, and its security, in the face of potential dangers to the world's oil supply? America Abroad examines the sources of instability, the possible consequences of a disruption in America's supply of oil, and the plausible alternatives to American dependence on foreign oil. 

Guests on this program include:

America's longstanding, and often close, relationship with Saudi Arabia has come under widespread criticism since the terrorist attacks of September 2001. America Abroad examines the role Saudi Arabia has played in the rise of Islamic terrorism, its influence in the Middle East and its potential role in the war against terrorism. 

Guests on this program include:

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